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Homeownership Benefits Extend Well Beyond Property Boundaries

Tuesday, March 21 2017 4:04 PM
Categorized In Default News Article Category

Most Americans consider homeownership to be the single best long-term investment and a primary source of financial security, especially as home values continue to strengthen. Despite the economic rollercoaster during the recession, homeownership has endured as the foundation of the American Dream.

Owning your home provides numerous benefits. It not only helps build financial strength and emotional wellbeing for you and your family, but it also leads to increased stability for the surrounding community.

We would like to take this opportunity to reinforce some of the many advantages homeownership can bring.

Financial Benefits: It’s nearly impossible to talk about homeownership without mentioning its most widely recognized benefit: financial fortitude. Beyond the appreciation factor (home values were up 6.3 percent nationally in the first quarter of 2016 compared to the first quarter of 2015), the monetary advantages of owning a home become most evident around tax time. American home owners saw their tax bills trimmed by a total of more than $100 billion in 2014.

Those who itemize their federal income tax deductions can deduct 100 percent of their mortgage interest payments on a first or second home, up to a maximum mortgage amount of $1 million. Other deductions include the interest paid on up to $100,000 of home equity loans, state and local real estate taxes, and any potential mortgage insurance premiums.

Sense of Community: Homeowners’ commitment to their community is often expressed through a higher level of civic participation – via volunteer programs, church and school activities, and property maintenance – resulting in a positive impact on their “social capital.”

Recent studies also have consistently shown homeowners are significantly less likely to become the victims of a crime. Stable neighborhoods with a predominant structure of homeownership consistently display stronger social ties among the residents. This generates added motivation to maintain a safe environment for themselves, their families and their neighbors.

Quality-of-life Enhancements: Above all else, having full control of one’s own home can be the most satisfying benefit. There’s an intangible sense of accomplishment that comes from being a homeowner. The freedom to personalize and make improvements to the home helps build equity in the home and increase satisfaction for the owner.

Maintenance Tips for New Home Owners

Tuesday, March 21 2017 4:00 PM
Categorized In Default News Article Category

As a new home owner, you are excited about getting your house in order — setting up furnishings, rearranging and decorating.  But once you have place for everything and everything in its place, it’s time to get a handle on the routine maintenance you’ll need to perform to help ensure that you and your family live comfortably in your new home for years to come. 

Maintaining a clean home is one way to ensure its longevity. Here are some tips for properly maintaining some of the systems in your new home:
 

Heating and Cooling Systems

Late summer or early fall are the ideal times to do an annual inspection and cleaning of these systems.

Change or wash the filters every three months.

If you have a gas furnace, keep your pilot light burning during the summer to help keep the furnace dry and prevent corrosion.

Registers help regulate the flow of air and maintain the desired temperature in your home.  Keep registers closed in rooms you don’t use to save on cooling/heating costs.
 

Plumbing

Every member of your family should know where the intake valves are located.  Label each one.

If any of your appliances develop a leak, inspect your drain trap.  A partially clogged drain can cause overflow. Use a plunger or a plumber’s snake to unclog the drain. If you need to, use boiling water to help unclog a partially opened drain. Call a plumber if these techniques don’t work.

A worn washer, a loose part in a faucet or steam in a hot water pipe are generally the causes of a noisy pipe.  Do not hesitate to repair the noise — vibrations can follow the noise and lead to leaks.

 Gutters and Downspouts

Clear away leaves, tree limbs and other debris from gutters and downspouts.

Turn the downspouts away from your home’s foundation.

Every four to six years, paint gutters that are not made of aluminum or vinyl to help prevent rust. 

Remember to read the instruction manual for every appliance in your new home.  The manuals provide recommended cleaning and maintenance schedules. Also familiarize yourself with any warranties you have on both the house and its systems. Some warranties may be voided if problems arise because of failure to perform routine maintenance.

 

Finding Design Ideas for Your Remodeling Project

Thursday, February 23 2017 4:22 PM
Categorized In Default News Article Category

You want to change the look and feel of your house, but you also want your remodeling job to look fresh for a number of years and complement the existing features of your home. How do you choose the right project and design for you and your family?

Woman looking at design samplesFirst, take your family’s lifestyle into account when selecting an area of your home to remodel. For example, if you get a lot of traffic through the house, consider hardwood floors. Families who frequently entertain in the kitchen may want to expand the room and add an island or some comfortable chairs. If your bathroom is the place where you escape the world, add a whirlpool tub or a deluxe shower.

After you’ve chosen an area of your home to remodel, the wide array of project options can be both dazzling and intimidating. To get started, consult the resources below, which can give you specific ideas on how to turn your house into the dream home you’ve always wanted.

TV Shows: There are an increasing number of shows and channels focused on decorating and simple home improvement projects to more complex remodels or home makeovers. For example, HGTV features projects that evolve from start to finish on shows like “Buying and Selling” and “Curb Appeal”; check your local television guide for listings. 

paint samples

Magazines: Magazines that cater to home improvement, lifestyle and remodeling can be an excellent source of ideas. Page through publications such as Dwell, Home, House Beautiful, Better Homes and Gardens, Southern Living, Coastal Living, Food and Wine, Country Living, Ladies' Home Journal and Good Housekeeping to identify projects and materials that might work in your home. Additionally, you can request a wide range of free or inexpensive literature by completing the mail-in coupons inserted in such publications.

Websites/Blogs: Surfing the Web is a great way to find fresh ideas and to research projects. Many remodelers, manufacturers and magazines host websites that feature project photos, buying guides and product information. Web directories such as the NAHB Remodelers Directory can help you find professional remodelers in your area. Other sites such as Pinterest and Houzz have extensive photo collections for inspiration. And, an increasing number of DIY and design blogs created by homeowners themselves can also provide inspiration for simple projects you can do around the house. 

Couple Looking at BlueprintsSketches and Floor Plans: No two remodeling projects are the same, but you can gain some insight into how another homeowner solved a space problem by carefully studying sketches and floor plans. If, like most people, you are easily confused by plans and drawings, imagine yourself in the middle of the room or space on the plan.

Books: Browse a bookstore with a well-stocked home improvement section, but beware of books telling you to be your own remodeling contractor. Most remodeling projects call for a level of skill and work hours beyond those stated in these books. The job of a professional remodeler requires experience and competence in a wide range of disciplines, and unless you are highly skilled and licensed in all the trades, you can quickly get in over your head.

Newspapers: Most newspapers publish regular sections devoted to real estate, home design and remodeling. Also, twice a year — usually in the spring and fall — many papers print special home improvement supplements. Each of these sections contains timely articles and useful advertisements on remodeling, home improvement, repair and maintenance. 

Installing WindowFriends, Family and Neighbors: Do you know someone who has recently remodeled their home in a style you admire? He or she may still have product manuals, magazines and other helpful information you can borrow, as well as practical advice drawn from his or her own experience.

Remodeling Professionals: One of the advantages of choosing a remodeler early is gaining access to an extensive library of resources prior to starting a project. Once you’ve chosen a contractor, he or she usually can offer you a wide variety of materials, including product manuals, magazines, brochures and blueprints. 

Manufacturers and Suppliers: The most obvious place to find information about new products and how to use them is on manufacturers’ Web sites and in magazine ads. Lumberyards, hardware stores and other suppliers also can be valuable sources of information. Many suppliers now offer home planning centers, where you can browse comfortably among the following:

  • Plan books
  • Product manuals
  • Sourcebooks
  • Building tips
  • Magazines
  • Brochures
  • Directories of local remodelers and builders 

Find more information on planning your remodeling project or to find a professional remodeler in our Remodeling section.

Homeownership: Opportunity is Knocking!

Thursday, February 23 2017 4:11 PM
Categorized In Default News Article Category

Homeownership is an important part of the American way of life, and there may never be a better time to buy than today.

Outstanding Opportunities

With the country still emerging from the recent recession, many people wonder if this is a good time to buy a home.

The answer is easy: Yes. It’s a very good time to purchase a home.

There are many opportunities in today’s market including low mortgage rates and new homes that are built to fit your lifestyle. But market conditions can change, and these opportunities may not be around for long, so home buyers shouldn’t wait.

And despite the housing downturn, home owners still place high value on owning a home, and recommend homeownership to others.

Interest Rates

Low Interest Rates

Today’s historically low interest rates are helping home buyers find affordable housing options. But, it's important to keep in mind that interest rates are sensitive to market forces and can change quickly. There’s no indication that rates will suddenly surge upward, but even a slight rate increase can push monthly payments to the point that a buyer might miss out on their first choice for a new home.

Large Downpayments Not Necessary

While lenders are looking more closely at borrowers today than in recent years, there are options for purchasing your home without a 20% downpayment. For example, the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) offers loans to first-time home buyers with downpayments as low as 3.5%. However, these loans require mortgage insurance.

To ensure that the process goes smoothly, buyers should consider pre-qualifying for a mortgage and having financing in place before shopping for a new home. Buyers also may find that some home builders have arranged favorable financing for their customers or offer financial incentives.

Built to Fit Your Lifestyle

Designed to accommodate today’s busy lifestyles, new homes – including urban condos and single-family homes – feature open floor plans, flexible spaces, low-maintenance materials and other amenities that make them more appealing than ever before.

Family

With energy costs near the top of consumer concerns, it’s good to know that new homes can be more energy efficient than ever. Innovative materials and construction techniques mean that today’s new homes are built to be much more energy efficient than homes constructed a generation ago. Not only can they be more affordable to operate, new homes also are significantly more resource efficient and environmentally friendly.

And in many areas, prospective home buyers who wish to live in age-qualified communities for those 55 and older will find a large selection of homes tailored to the evolving lifestyles of the baby boom generation.

Benefits for Home Owners

Homeownership also provides important benefits to owners.

Tax Benefits: For Home Owners Only

Unique tax benefits that apply only to housing help lower the cost of homeownership. Both mortgage interest and property taxes are deductible. Moreover, for married couples, profits of up to $500,000 on the sale of a principal residence ($250,000 for single taxpayers) are excluded from tax on capital gains.

Baby

The Advantage of Leveraging

Leveraging is another advantage of homeownership. A buyer can purchase a home and receive the full benefit of homeownership with a cash downpayment that is only a fraction of the total purchase price. This is called leveraging, and it makes the rate of return on a home purchase greater than on other purchases with the same value, such as stocks, where the buyer must put up the entire price.

Building Personal Resources

For most Americans, homeownership is a primary source of net worth and an important step in accumulating personal financial assets over the long term. Although property values have declined in many markets, Americans have more than $10.8 trillion of equity in their homes, and for most families, home equity represents the largest share of net worth.

There Really is No Place Like Home

Although there are many positive financial aspects to homeownership, a home cannot be valued in monetary terms alone. Not only can homeownership be a stepping stone to greater financial well-being, it provides a permanent place to call home and great personal satisfaction.

Academic research also shows that homeownership provides a wide range of social benefits and strengthens the nation’s people and its communities.

Homeownership is truly a cornerstone of the American way of life.

While NAHB has used its best efforts to provide accurate information, NAHB makes no representations or warranties with respect to the accuracy or comprehensiveness of this brochure’s contents. NAHB specifically disclaims any implied warranties. The information provided in this document may not be suitable or applicable to your unique circumstances. You should consult with a qualified professional when applying this information to your own situation. NAHB will not be liable for any loss of profits or damages, including incidental, consequential, special or other damages.

Decoding Energy Efficiency Lingo

Friday, February 3 2017 11:42 AM
Categorized In Default News Article Category

The terminology for energy-efficient homes can be very technical and confusing to home owners. Here are some simple definitions to help you understand popular energy-saving options for your home.

 
Energy-Efficient Home
A home that uses less energy than a traditional home without compromising service to owners and occupants.

Energy efficiency can be achieved through things such as improved thermal envelopes, solar-oriented construction, low-e windows and efficient appliances. Note that energy efficiency and energy conservation are different in that conservation efforts reduce or eliminate services to save energy.

Learn how efficient your home is now and ways to improve your home's efficiency with ENERGY STAR's Home Energy Yardstick.

Net Zero-Energy Home
A home in which energy production and consumption are equivalent. That means the energy produced by the home must meet the household's needs. Rooftop solar panels are perhaps the most common way for homes to produce energy.
To help achieve net-zero energy, the home should be designed using a holistic, whole-house approach that strives for efficiency and reduces energy consumption without sacrificing service or comfort. To see examples of zero-energy homes, take a look at Kaupuni Village in Hawaii.

Net Zero-Energy-Ready Home
A home that is outfitted with the necessary structural and technological support to install energy-producing technologies.
Net zero energy-ready homes are appropriate for home owners who plan to install energy-producing technology in the future but do not have the means or desire to do so at the current time. When the home owner is ready to install such technology, it will be a much simpler process.

Net Positive-Energy Home A home that produces more energy than the household needs. A home owner could receive credit from their utility company for the excess energy returned to the grid that is produced by the energy technologies and saved by energy-efficiency measures.

2016 Fall Parade of Homes Winners Announced

Tuesday, October 4 2016 3:19 PM
Categorized In Wichita Parade of Homes

Judging for the 2016 Fall Parade of Homes is completed and you can click below to see a compelte list of the winners.

In addition to these winners, there are many great homes to look at during the Parade of Homes that you won't want to miss.

Pick up a Parade of Homes magazine from the racks at most area grocery stores, at the homes that are in the Parade or you can download it from this website by clicking on the Parade of Homes logo on our home page and it will take you directly to where you will find the entire magazine.

The Parade of Homes hours continue from Noon to 6:00 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday, October 8th & 9th and 15th & 16th.

Find the Homes of Your Dreams! 

Click here for the 2016 Fall Parade of Homes Winners Ad.pdf

Assess Your Home's Efficiency with an Energy Audit

Tuesday, August 16 2016 4:11 PM
Categorized In Default News Article Category

 

You may be wondering how to save money on your energy bills this year. Conducting a do-it-yourself home energy audit is a fast, relatively simple way to assess how much energy your home consumes and determine what you can do to make your home more energy efficient.

caulking

A home energy audit will show you where your home is losing energy, how efficient your heating and cooling systems are, and ways to conserve electricity. All it takes is a thorough inspection of the areas listed here and keeping a checklist of the problems you found.

  Air leaks. Stopping or minimizing drafts can save on annual energy costs. Some places to inspect where air commonly seeps from homes include gaps around baseboards, wall and ceiling junctures, electrical outlets, switch plates, window frames, weather stripping, fireplace dampers, attic doors, window-mounted air conditioners and foundation seals.

  On your home’s exterior, look at the areas where two different building materials meet, such as corners and areas where siding or brick come together with chimneys or the foundation. If you can rattle windows or see daylight around door or window frames, you likely are losing air.

 Once you’ve identified the leaks, seal them with caulk, weather stripping or the same material as the original seal. You can also attach plastic sheets around your windows.

 Insulation. In older homes especially, you may have insufficient insulation in the ceiling and walls. Your attic door should be insulated and close tightly. Openings around pipes, ductwork and chimneys should be sealed. Look for a vapor barrier — tarpaper or a plastic sheet — under the attic insulation. To check your walls, make a small hole in a closet or other out-of-the-way place and probe into the wall with a long stick or screwdriver. If it's an outside wall, the area should be completely filled with an insulating material.  

 Fill the gaps in any openings with expanding foam. Flexible caulk should be used to seal any electrical boxes in the ceiling. If your home lacks a vapor barrier, consider painting interior ceilings with vapor barrier paint. This reduces the amount of water vapor that can pass through the ceiling, which reduces your insulation’s effectiveness.

 Heating and Cooling Equipment. Inspect your heating and cooling equipment. See if ducts and pipes located in unheated spaces and your water heater and hot water pipes are insulated. Dirt streaks around your ductwork, especially near the seams, are evidence of leaks.

 Have your equipment checked and cleaned by a professional annually. If you have a forced-air furnace, replace your filters as soon as they are dirty. Even if they aren’t, replace them every 30 to 60 days.

 Lighting. Look at the bulbs in your home and determine if a lower-watt bulb would work just as well for your needs. For lights that will be used more than two hours each day, replace your incandescent bulbs with compact fluorescent bulbs and you can save up to 75% of the energy used for lighting.

 A home audit is a great way to find out your home’s energy deficiencies and make simple improvements that will save you time and money in the long run.

Make Your Home Safe for All Ages

Tuesday, August 16 2016 3:39 PM
Categorized In Default News Article Category

 

Your 80-year-old aunt is coming to stay for a few days. You're looking forward to the visit, but realize your home may not be entirely "older-generation" friendly. To help enhance the safety and comfort of your visitor, especially one who may have some of the physical challenges that come with aging, here are a few quick and inexpensive things you can do to make the time less stressful for you and more comfortable for your guest:

Consider pathways in the house. Clear obstacles, and maybe even move furniture that a person usually has to maneuver around. Move any electrical cords that are where a person might walk – perhaps taping them to a wall or using a hook. Clear stairs of any objects—shoes, books, and other personal items that tend to collect on the lower treads. Also check that railings on stairs inside and out are secure, and make repairs where needed.

Lighting is crucial. Put night lights in bathrooms, the guest bedroom, any hallways near the guest bedroom, and perhaps in the kitchen. Make sure there is a lamp or light switch within easy reach of the guest bed so that your visitor can keep a light on until safely tucked in. Well-lit outdoor walkways and entrances are also key for coming or going when it is dark.

Be sure the shower your guest will use has a non-slip floor. To enhance the traction, apply non-slip strips or a suction-attached non-slip mat, both readily available at home improvement stores.

Secure or, preferably, remove any throw rugs, including bathroom mats. Edges of rugs can be a tripping hazard, and even a slight scoot can affect a person’s balance. If there are rugs you want to secure rather than remove, non-slip pads can help, but safer still would be to apply double-sided carpet tape or even caulk to attach the rug to the floor. If you choose one of these methods, be mindful that you don't mar the floor underneath.

soft couchIdentify seating in your gathering rooms that is appropriately firm, high in the seat, and preferably that has arms to help a person easily sit down and get up. A chair that is too soft or too low to the ground can strand a person awkwardly. If in doubt about the available seating in the room, bring a dining chair with arms into the room as an alternative.

If you are considering other more long-term home modifications for aging in place, be sure to consult a remodeler or contractor who is a Certified Aging-in-Place Specialist. Find one in your area using the CAPS directory.

Housing Trends for Baby Boomer

Tuesday, August 16 2016 9:58 AM
Categorized In Default News Article Category

 New Features Keep Pace with this Active Generation

Baby boomers, who were the largest American generation until the Millennials took over, are either retired or quickly nearing retirement age. Boomers, born between 1946 and 1964 and who count more than 76 million, may be getting older, but they are definitely not ready to head to the retirement home!  

The boomer generation is more active than generations past, has a more sophisticated style and wants options and choices in their homes. Whether they are selling the homes where they raised their children and heading to sunnier pastures, or staying put and redesigning to accommodate their retired lifestyle, boomers are making an impact on housing trends.

Aging in Place

Some features that home builders and remodelers are seeing as they begin to cater to the boomers include: 

Home Offices: Some boomers are choosing to work past the age of 65. As they transition from a traditional 9-to-5 job, however, they want home offices for flexibility. A second career or part-time employment often eliminates the hassle of commuting while keeping them active and bringing in supplementary income.    

Tech/Media Centers: The tech-savvy boomer generation wants top-of-the-line amenities for their homes such as a media room with surround sound and central control systems, which manage all media sources in one location. The house may include a wireless home network, remote control lighting and security features. 

Wider Doors and Hallways: As a person ages, there is a likelihood that use of a wheelchair might become a necessity. Designing a home that is livable now but can transition and be functional as the occupant ages is important in ensuring that the home will be a good long-term investment. Wider doors and hallways are useful for moving larger furniture today, and will also be wheelchair accessible tomorrow. 

Better Lighting/Bigger Windows: The need for more lighting usually increases as we grow older. To accommodate this, builders are adding more windows and making them larger to let in more natural light. They are also adding more light fixtures in areas including under cabinets and in stairwells. Multiple switches to reduce the number of trips and dimmer controls to eliminate glare are other options. 

First-Floor Bedrooms and Bathrooms: More than 40% of new homes have master suites downstairs, a 15% increase over a decade ago. Boomers not wishing to go up and down stairs with bad knees and aching backs have helped fuel this trend. The bedrooms also are also larger, with more spacious walk-in closets and bathrooms that have a separate tub and shower and dual sinks. 

Easy to Maintain Exteriors/Landscaping: Yard work, painting, and other landscaping chores may no longer be enjoyable to aging home owners. People who move to a new home when they retire may opt for a maintenance-free community. Those that choose to stay in their homes might make improvements to exterior surfaces such as installing stucco, brick or low-maintenance siding. Lawns are being replaced with living patios, decorative landscaping, or flower beds which can be a hobby for gardening enthusiasts.  

Flex Space: Flex space has become more prevalent in both new homes and remodeling. Flex spaces are rooms that take on the purpose of the present home owner's needs but can adjust with changes as they occur. What may have once started out as a guest bedroom can be redecorated to serve as a hobby room or library. This allows home owners to stay in their homes longer as it continues to serve their needs throughout life’s stages.

A Certified Aging-in-Place Specialist (CAPS) has been trained in the unique needs of the older adult population, aging-in-place home modifications, common remodeling projects, and solutions to common barriers. Access our directories to find a designated CAPS builder or remodeler in your area.

Advice on Financing Your First Home

Tuesday, August 16 2016 9:50 AM
Categorized In Default News Article Category

Buying your first house is very exciting. But financing your home purchase can be a daunting experience. In both cases, do your research and shop carefully to ensure you find exactly what you want and need.

Deciding how much to spend on your home and which type of mortgage will work best for you — as well as understanding the settlement process — can be confusing. However, there are many sources that can help you get prepared well before you step foot into a sales office, model home or open house.

  • Get familiar with the lingo. NAHB's Home Buyer’s Dictionary can help you.
  • Figure out what you can actually afford to pay on a monthly basis. Remember that, in addition to the monthly principal and interest, you will also pay into escrows for property taxes, hazard insurance and possibly a home owners' or condominium association assessment. You have more knowledge about your living expenses than a lender. Hold firm with that number and don’t be tempted to agree to an amount higher than what you are comfortable spending. Mortgage calculators are a great way to figure out what your monthly payments would be based on interest rates and down payment amounts. Calculators can be found on most real-estate-focused websites.
  • Pay down your debts. Credit card debt limits what you qualify for from a lender. Lenders want to see a total debt service ratio that is less than 40% of your monthly income.
  • Attend a first-time home buying seminar or talk to a credit counselor who does not work for a lender. You can research your options without being influenced by someone who has a financial interest in the home or loan you choose. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) offers free housing counseling and seminars.
  • HUD also has a handy booklet on its site called “Buying Your Home: Settlement Costs and Information.” It describes process and explains most of the expenses you will encounter. It is free and most lenders are required to provide their loan applicants with a copy of this document under the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA). However, you will be able to shop more wisely for settlement services if you have read this information before you visit a lender.
  • When you have done your research and are ready to move on to the next step, visit a lender, understand the loan choices that would be available to you, and, once you’ve determined the most suitable loan, get pre-approved for that loan. Since you will already know how much money you can borrow, you will know what price range you should look at and can move quickly if you are bidding on a house that has several interested buyers. A lender’s pre-approval would still be subject to a final verification of your credit and a satisfactory appraisal, but it’s a big step toward becoming a home owner.

Guide to Buying a Home

Tuesday, June 14 2016 10:52 AM
Categorized In Default News Article Category

If you are thinking of buying a new home, you must pay close attention to many details to ensure that you find one that will suit your needs and preferences.  Before you start shopping, you should sit down with the members of your household to discuss your preferences and the many options available to you.

Here are some things you should consider:

Step 1: Financing Your Home

The first step in the home buying process is determining how much you can afford.  Check out our “Advice for Financing Your First Home” to learn more about how you can prepare for the financing process. To ensure that the financing process goes smoothly, buyers should consider pre-qualifying for a mortgage and having a financing commitment in place before shopping for a new home.

Step 2: Prioritizing Most-Wanted Features

Before you start shopping, you should sit down with the members of your household to discuss your preferences and the many options available to you.
An easy way to organize your thoughts is to write each separate feature that you want on a 3X5 card, and arrange the cards in order of their importance to you. For instance, if you like to cook, you may want a home with a large, well-equipped kitchen. Or you may settle for a small kitchen, so that you can have extra space for a library, office or playroom. Some home buyers seek large, open interior spaces, while others prefer traditional rooms that afford more privacy. While looking for a home, consider whether your needs are likely to change over time. If you plan to add rooms, find out if there is enough space on your site for such expansion and whether such additions are permitted by your local jurisdiction.

Step 3: Selecting the Type of Home

Options include single-family homes and condominiums. Some home buyers prefer homes with large yards. Others opt for condominiums where they can avoid yard maintenance entirely. With a single-family home in a development, you'll be responsible for your own yard and home, but may be restricted to certain design elements or other regulations if there is a home owners association. A condominium is a home in a multi-unit complex, such as an apartment building or a townhouse cluster. You own the home, and you and your neighbors jointly own the common elements, such as the land around the complex, the parking areas, building exteriors, hallways, utility pipes and recreational facilities. A condominium owners association is responsible for maintaining the jointly owned elements. The day-to-day business of the complex is generally handled by a managing agency. Learn more about the types of home construction

Step 4: Starting Your House Hunt

Now that you know the type of home and features you are looking for, and how much home you can afford, you're ready to begin searching for your perfect home. Whether you use a realtor to find an existing home or work with a builder to buy a new home, you'll be more focused with your search.

Routine Home Maintenance

Thursday, May 19 2016 3:54 PM
Categorized In Default News Article Category

Your home may be the biggest investment you will ever make. Taking good care of it with regular maintenance is necessary to preserve its value and ensure it will provide a comfortable, safe shelter for you and your family for years to come. 

Maintenance Inside the Home

Home owner fixing a sink

Air Filters

  • Many types of heating and air conditioning systems contain filters to remove dirt and dust from the air. Check the instruction book or search online by model number: In many cases, the home owner should change filters at least every three months.

Sinks

  • It's also a good idea to clean your faucet's aerator — which is the spring inside the end of the faucet — every three to four months.
  • To maintain your garbage disposal, you should run cold water through it during use.

Fireplaces

  • When you're ready to use your fireplace, be sure to build the fire on the andirons or grate, never on the fireplace floor.
  • To prevent soot and to add color to the fire, throw in a handful of salt.
  • Store your firewood outside, away from the house and not directly on the ground.
  • Have a CSIA-Certified chimney sweep inspect your chimney and fireplace annually, especially if you build a lot of fires in the winter.

Floors

  • To maintain unpainted concrete floors in your basement or garage, first apply a concrete sealer, which makes them easier to clean. When you're ready to clean them, use a solution of four to six tablespoons of washing soda in a gallon of hot water. Add scouring powder to the solution for tough jobs.
  • For hardwood, be sure the floors have a polyurethane finish before cleaning with water. Hardwood floors that do not have a polyurethane finish will need to be waxed periodically. Use liquid or paste "spirit" wax.
  • The best polish for vinyl floors in water emulsion wax.

Walls

  • Masonry walls sometimes develop a white powdery substance. This is called efflorescence, a crystallized soluble salt that can be removed by scrubbing with water and a stiff brush.

Safety and Security

  • If you have a home security system, regularly check the alarms and circuit breakers to ensure they are in working order. Inspect the sensors one by one. 
  • The batteries in your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors should also be checked twice a year to ensure they are operable. Hard-wired and battery-powered detectors should be replaced every 10 years.

 

Maintenance Outside the Home

 Roof, Gutters and Downspouts

  • A qualified roofer should inspect your roof every three years. Skylights should also be inspected each time your roof is inspected so leaks don't develop from cracks and interruptions around the seals, caulking and flashings.
  • Make sure that gutters and downspouts do not get clogged with leaves or other objects.

Windows and Doors

  • Inspect exterior windows and doors yearly to see if the caulking around them has split and cracked. If so, replace the caulk and clean any mildew.
  • For a simple solution to wash extremely dirty exterior windows, combine equal parts vinegar and water or three tablespoons of denatured alcohol per quart of warm water. Use a piece of crumbled newspaper to wash the glass to avoid lint left behind by paper towels.
  • To help a window slide easily, rub the channel with a piece of parrafin.

Siding

  • Inspect your siding yearly to determine if your wood-sided home needs to be repainted. Trim shrubbery away so that it does not touch the siding.
  • The exterior of your house is built to withstand exposure to the elements, but a periodic cleaning will improve the appearance and, in many instances, prolong the life of siding and other exterior products.

Garage

  • The moving parts of garage doors should be oiled every three months.

Simple Repairs

 Faucets, Sinks and Toilets

  • If you have a water leak, the washer in your faucet usually needs to be replaced.
  • For clogged drains, use a plunger and/or a plumber's snake.
  • To unclog a toilet, use a coil spring-steel auger, which can be found at hardware or home-improvement stores.

Pipes

  • Noisy water pipes should be fixed promptly. The condition that causes noisy pipes may be accompanied by vibration that can cause fittings to loosen and leak.
  • Frozen pipes should be thawed slowly to prevent the formation of steam, which could cause the pipes to burst.

Walls

  • Use spackling to fill nail holes and cracks in plaster walls and gypsum wallboard.

9 Overlooked Spring Cleaning Jobs

Thursday, May 19 2016 3:41 PM
Categorized In Default News Article Category

With winter finally leaving and warmer weather on the way, it’s time to tackle all that spring cleaning!

It can be a lengthy process but it’s important that you don’t miss these often overlooked steps.

Exterior Jobs

Winter can be rough on the exterior of your home. So you should start on the exterior before the spring rains cause more problems.

1. Clean out the gutters of any debris leftover from the winter storms and check to make sure your gutters are still securely fastened.

2. Clear away all the debris from your exterior drains. This will allow the heavy spring rains to properly flow and prevent back ups.

3. Check your windows for any cracking or splitting from the caulk. If so, clean off the mildew and replace the caulk.

4. The warming weather will inevitably lead to outdoor entertaining, so don’t forget to clean off your patio furniture using a mild soap and warm water. Gently scrub away any dirt that has collected over the winter. If you have wrought iron and rust has started forming, gently sand it off.

Now, wipe off your shoes and head inside.

Interior Jobs

5. Unplug your refrigerator, slide it away from the wall and vacuum the dust that has accumulated on the condenser coils. This task may seem small, but can greatly extend the life of your refrigerator.

6. Vacuum out the dust that is sticking to your air vents. After the vents are clear of dust, apply a thin layer of car wax on all surfaces of the vent to prevent dust from sticking and to allow for easier airflow.

Call in the Pros

There are still a few things left that should be done by professionals.

7. If you built a lot of fires over the winter, have a CSIA-Certified chimney sweep inspect your chimney and fireplace. This should be done annually to prevent house fires. As a bonus tip, throw a handful of salt into a fire to prevent soot and add some color to the flame!

8. Have a contractor certified by National Roofing Contractors Association inspect your roof for any missing, warped or loose shingles and check for loose seals on your skylights.

9. Before the weather warms up too much, have your HVAC system inspected by a qualified technician and, if needed, replace your filters.

Now that you've checked these jobs off your list, you can start enjoying the spring!

Your 2016 Home Maintenance To-Do List

Thursday, April 28 2016 3:15 PM
Categorized In Default News Article Category

Homeownership is the American dream, but it’s also a lot of work. Your home is a significant investment and requires a consistent level of upkeep to maintain its efficiency and to protect its value.

As you make new resolutions for 2016, set aside some time to build a schedule of your ongoing home maintenance duties. Creating a calendar of anticipated maintenance needs will help you remember key milestones and better prepare for any big expenses.

The following examples of typical home maintenance should be completed at least annually. Consider your home’s specific needs to determine the relevance and timing of each task, and mark your calendar appropriately. 

In the spring:

  • Inspect the roof for snow damage.
  • Examine the condition of glazing compound, caulking, and interior and exterior paint.
  • Check for broken glass and screens in windows and storm doors. (It’s also a good idea to do this the fall.)
  • Look for evidence of termites such as sagging floors and ceilings or dry, brown tunnels in the ground near the home’s foundation.
  • Seed and feed the lawn, plant annuals and trim perennials that need pre-growth pruning.

In the fall:

  • Add mulch around perennials that need protection from winter weather.
  • Clear the lawn of leaves and reseed patchy areas.
  • Inspect the driveway for any cracks, and repair any damage with driveway filler and coat with a commercial sealer.
  • Look for any cracks or damage to the fireplace, and have the chimney cleaned by a licensed chimney sweep.

Before winter:

  • Inspect the roof, address any damaged shingles or flashings, and remove any debris.
  • Ensure gutters are securely fastened to the fascia board and clear them of any debris or build up that could inhibit proper drainage. 
  • Remove hose connections, then drain and store hoses to keep them from freezing.
  • Empty clay pots and planters of all soil, which can freeze and cause the pots to crack.

Anytime throughout the year:

  • Check all electrical connections for potential hazards. Pay special attention to any overloaded extension cords, and repair or replace any worn or frayed cords of electrical appliances.
  • Test your carbon monoxide, radon and smoke detectors. Clean each unit with a vacuum or cotton swab and replace batteries and light bulbs, if needed.
  • Have your heating and air conditioning system(s) inspected and cleaned. If your system has a filter, replace it once every three months.
  • Inspect all doors and windows for proper operation and ensure the weather stripping is not cracked or torn.  
  • Inspect the attic insulation to ensure the entire ceiling area is covered. Insulation should not touch the underside of the roof sheathing, nor should it block vents in the eaves, which could cause condensation buildup and poor air circulation.
  • Oil the motors of appliances as directed in their instruction manuals.
  • Periodically check storage areas, closets and the basement to ensure that any oily rags, gas cans, paint supplies, cleaning materials or other flammable items have been stored properly.
  • Check the functionality of your security system, inspecting each sensor and confirming the primary and backup batteries are in working order.
  • Inspect interior stairs and exterior steps for any damage that could cause someone to fall. Make sure handrails and railings are sturdy and securely attached.

The joys of homeownership come with a long list or responsibilities. But staying on top of these duties will help keep your home healthy as the seasons change and the years pass.

How to Evaluate Online Reviews When Choosing a Remodeler

Thursday, April 28 2016 2:57 PM
Categorized In Default News Article Category

Embarrassed by your outdated kitchen or tired of that ugly bathroom, but aren’t yet ready to move to a new home? Remodeling those rooms is your next best option. And there is no better time to consider a remodeling project than during National Remodeling Month in May!

But beware that even a seemingly simple modification to your home could become a dangerous task for even the most confident do-it-yourselfer. By first consulting with a professional remodeler, you could save yourself a lot of time, money and headache by getting the job done right the first time. Yet with so many remodelers to choose from, how do you find the right one for you and your home?

The easiest way to begin your remodeler reconnaissance is by going online.

 Proceed with Caution

The Internet makes it easy to find a wealth of information with just a few quick clicks of the mouse. Much of what you find will provide some useful background, but you can’t believe everything you see or read. When looking through customer rating sites, use good judgment to weigh the value of certain online reviews (positive or negative).

 Keep in mind:

  • Customers who had any sort of negative experience are much more motivated to post an online review than those who had a thoroughly positive experience.
  • A few negative reviews of a less-experienced remodeler carry far more weight than the same number of negative reviews of an established remodeler with several years (or decades) of experience.
  • An abundance of positive, brief, non-descript reviews can often indicate phony reviewers.
  • The Better Business Bureau, www.bbb.org, is a good resource to ensure the business doesn’t have any unresolved complaints. Other sites worth noting include Angie’s List, HomeAdvisor, Houzz, etc.

Remember, the most accurate customer review will always come directly from the mouth of a previous client. If you don’t happen to know any former clients of the remodelers you are considering, simply ask those remodelers for references of recent projects.

To find a reliable Remodeling Council contractor that is a member of The Wichita Area Builders Association, click on “Find a Member” and then “Remodelers Council.” You will find a list of current members of the Council. Another good resource is our “Remodelers Council Directory and Resource Guide” which you can also access through our website at www.wabahome.com.

2016 Spring Parade of Homes Winners Announced

Tuesday, April 12 2016 11:39 AM
Categorized In Wichita Parade of Homes

The judging for the 2016 Spring Parade of Homes winners is completed and you can click below to see a complete list of the winners.

In addition to these winners, there are many great homes to look at during the Parade of Homes that you won't want to miss.

Pick up a Parade of Homes magazine from area grocery stores, Parade homes or download it from this website for more detailed information and a map of locations.

The Parade of Homes hours continue from Noon to 6:00 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday, April 16 & 17 and 23rd & 24th!

Come and see the home of your dreams!

 

 Spring 2016 Parade of Homes Winners.pdf

New Homes Attract Consumers Looking to Save on Energy Costs

Wednesday, April 6 2016 8:46 AM
Categorized In Default News Article Category

The home building industry celebrates New Homes Month in April by sharing the top features that will be seen in typical new homes built in 2016. Once again, builders are responding to what home buyers want by offering greater efficiency in the design and function of the home.

"Today's new homes include features that will help homeowners reduce energy consumption and enhance the conveniences of modern living," said Ed Brady, chairman of the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) and a home builder and developer from Bloomington, Ill. "Our builders are telling us that energy efficiency continues to be a top demand from consumers."

 NAHB recently surveyed builders about the features they are most likely to include in new homes they build this year. Four of the top 10 features focused on energy efficiency: low-E windows, Energy Star-rated appliances and windows, and programmable thermostats.

 These features correspond to the list of features that consumers say are most important to them, as well. According to NAHB's latest survey of home buyer preferences, Energy Star appliances and windows, as well as an Energy Star rating for the entire house, are among the top five most-wanted features.

 In fact, home buyers are willing to pay more for a home if they can get lower utility costs in return. On average, they will pay an additional $10,732 up front to save $1,000 a year in utilities.

 Other popular features that builders said they are most likely to add to their homes include a walk-in closet in the master bedroom, laundry room, great room (kitchen-family room-living room) and a central island and granite countertop in the kitchen.

Top 5 Reasons Why Millennials Should Enter the Housing Market Now

Thursday, March 17 2016 3:09 PM
Categorized In Default News Article Category
With the economy and housing market still recovering, some potential first-time home buyers may be hesitant to invest in a new home.  Yet there are several reasons why now is a great time for Millennials and other first-time home buyers to start building their American Dream.

Interest rates are low.
Today's historically low interest rates are helping first-time home buyers find affordable housing options. Average weekly interest rates for a 30-year fixed mortgage remain under 4.5%.But it's important to keep in mind that interest rates are sensitive to market forces and can change quickly. There's no indication that rates will suddenly surge upward, but even a slight rate increase can push monthy payments to the point that a buyer might miss out on their first choice for a new home.
 
Huge downpayments are not necessary.

While lenders are looking more closely at borrowers today than in recent years, there are options for purchasing your first home without a 20% downpayment. For example, the FEderal Housing Administration (FHA) offers loans to first-ime home buyers with downpayments as low as 3.5%. However, these loans require mortgage insurance.To ensure that the financing process goes smoothly, buyers should consider pre-qualifying for a mortgage and having a financing commitment in place before shopping for a new home. Buyers also may find that some home builders have arranged favorable financing for their customers or offer financial incentives.

New homes are built to fit your lifestyle.

Designed to accommodate today's busy lifestyles, new homes - including urban condos and single-famiy homes - feature open floor plans, flexible spaces, low-maintenance materials and other amenities that appeal to younger buyers.With energy costs newar the top of consumer concerns, it's good to know that new homes can be more energy efficient than ever. Innovative materials and construction techniques mean that today's new homes are built to be much more energy efficient than homes constructed a generation ago.  Not only can they be more affordable to operate, new homes also are significantly more resource efficient and environmentally friendly.

Technology makes house shopping fun and easy.

Today's tech-savvy home buyers use mobile apps to quickly gather all of the key information on a property and to see extensive photos from their cell phones or tablets.  For example, Homesnap allows you to snap a picture of any home and get all the relevant property details, including any interior photos for homes on the market.If you're just beginning  your search, Realtor.com is a popular app becuase it generally contains the most accurate information gathered from more than 800 local MLS's (multiple listing services).There are also several free mortgage apps to help you determine how much you can afford and to compare real-time rates from multiple lenders.  Popular mortgage calculator apps include Zillow and Trulia.

Owning a home can help young families build wealthy and combat rising rents.

For most Americans, homeownership is a primary source of new worth and is an important step in accumulating personal financial assets over the long term.  Although property values have declined in many markets, Americans have more than $10.8 trillion of equity in their homes, and for most families, home equity represents the largest share of net worth.  At the same time, rent prices continue to climb - 2.8 percent in 2013 - as rental vacancies dropped to their lowest po int since 2000, according to a recent report from Harvard University's Joint Center for Housing Studies. That makes now a great time to start investing in your future - insead of your landlord's.

Creating a Home Office that Works for You

Wednesday, September 2 2015 10:02 AM
Categorized In Press Releases
Home offices are becoming less of a luxury and more of a necessity with more people telecommuting or running their own businesses from their homes.  It is estimated that one in five Americans work from home. And with the fluctuating cost of gas and increased traffic causing longer commutes, that number is likely to grow even more every year.

Work space is no longer relegated just to the kitchen table or a corner of the guest bedroom; it has been promoted to a room of its own in the home. If you are looking to create a home office, or revamp an existing one, keep the following points in mind:

Separate Your Space
Although you are physically working in the house, it is important to set up your home office so that the lines between your home life and your work life do not get blurred.  By creating a barrier, you will be less tempted to take a television break in teh middle of your work day or work on spreadsheets when you are supposed to be "home form the office."

Design Your Office to Match Your Work Style
When choosing the furniture and layout of your office, make sure it fits the way you choose to work. For example, if you believe in "a place for everything and everything i its place," be sure to allot enough space for adequate storage and file cabinets. If you work on several different projects, set up separate, smaller work stations dedicasted to each task.

Show Off Your Style
There is no such thing as "one design fits all." While one person may prefer the look of dark woods and rich colors, comeone else may favor a more shimsical look with bright colors and clean lines. This is your chance to bring in designs and tiems that best reflect your personality and interests. Dont be restricted by what you think a home office should look like. Make it your own since you will be the one spending the most time there.

Make it Comfortable
When choosing the furniture and amenities for your office, make sure that you are physically comfortable and that your work space is conducive to productivity.

     *  You chair should be adjustable with adequate seat cushioning.
     *  Add a couch or armchair to allow for additional seating for guests or to provide a place to read away from your desk.
     *  Install recessed lighting which is less harsh on your eyes.
     *  Buy smaller desktop lights focused on task areas that are used for reading and writing to reduce eye strain.